Sunday, November 16, 2008

Irrational Exuberance

Robustly caffeinated and the only person awake in the house, I've been plotting various projects I will finally have the time to pursue once I am officially unemployed and never again have to slog through another crummy James Patterson or Stephenie Meyer novel. Many and varied writing endeavors, an ambitious high-minded reading program, more piano, contemplative nature walks, deeper involvement with community, cleaner house, catch up on Mad Men, skinny, etc., etc., etc.

Obviously I'm ignoring the no-money part of this equation, but shut up! Don't rain on my parade. 

Since this is a cooking blog I'll only list upcoming food-oriented projects:
1. Build an earth oven. Don't know if this is exactly the model of what we'll end up with, but I've wanted an outdoor wood-burning oven for many years.  I hope it's not against the law. I'm recruiting my engineering-genius/ceramicist mother, to help me. Are you reading this, Mom?


2. Backyard orchard. We have a decent start (thriving apple, thriving plum, two moderately healthy figs, moderately healthy Meyer lemon and Bearss lime, languishing persimmon, deer-ravaged baby loquat, and pathetic Babcock peach that I will uproot this winter. Done with peaches.) Goal: more figs in deer-accessible areas, two healthy persimmons (one hachiya, one fuyu), one apricot, a pear (espaliered?), a kumquat, a Kaffir lime, a quince, maybe more plums because they love it here, maybe another variety of apple, and what else? Grapes all along the fences. Trying gooseberries again, plus raspberries. Currants? I'm recruiting my horticulturally-gifted father to help me. I hope you're reading this, Dad.

3. Vegetable garden. Okay. Boring. But going to happen again when they restore the gravel pit to its natural dirt state. 

4. Curry leaf plant. Do not know where I can find one of these, but want one.

5. Bees. Thinking about it. The only problem is that I am really scared of bees. So maybe not, unless Mark wants to take charge.

6. Chickens. Thinking about it. Too Clampett-like for Mill Valley? Should I care? Must check the county ordinances to see what we're allowed. Are we really chicken people? Are eggs expensive enough to merit the hassle of building a chicken coop? How do you build a chicken coop?

I may erase this post later when I am feeling less irrationally exuberant. I am also concerned that my spouse will read it and have a small heart attack. So enjoy while you can.


8 comments:

  1. CHICKENS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.

    ReplyDelete
  2. 1. It seems to me we should grow a renewable forest as a source of lumber.
    2. Also, we need to get the kids used to the idea of waking up at 5 a.m. to milk the chickens.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm reading it. It's Fuyu, I think, and I would pass on apricot. Your climate should be best for apple, plum and pear.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hey! I want chickens, too! I'm sure they are absolutely not allowed where I live, but I did see 16 wild turkeys crossing the road to other day, and they don't even reqire a coop...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Duh, fuyu.
    But someone I know in Tiburon grows such amazing apricots in a very similar microclimate. Seems worth a try.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hey Philomere,
    I'll share my chicken information when I get it. Someone nearby here in Mill Valley has them. Legally.

    ReplyDelete
  7. if this be unemployment, bring it on! cock-a-doodle-do,,,
    or was it just the coffee?

    ReplyDelete
  8. If I may jump in, I enthusiastically endorse chickens. They are crazy easy to take care of, and for such a reward! You can let them scratch around in your orchard and they'll help with pests (Your husband may be unhappy about the poop everywhere, though, like mine is.). Our coop is a screened-in section at the back of a shed, and works very well.

    I think we have finally convinced my mom to get bees--we have a few neighbors with them, and they love it. Also very low-maintenance.

    Jealous of your orchard.

    That is all.

    ReplyDelete